Good Things Come to Those Who Wait: Journée du Patrimoine

2013 was the year of waiting, for me at least. I have waited for almost every major life event that happened this year. I waited for the right time to resign. I waited for the results of my program application. But, I wouldn’t be able to attend the program if not for the scholarship grant, so I waited for the results. Eventually, I then waited for my last day at work which was 6 months after I tendered my resignation. Finally, I waited for the day of my flight.  Although this wasn’t really the end of the waiting game.

Yes, I did a lot of waiting, but each of these made a big impact on my life. It will be too long for me to explain so let me just get to the point, sort of.

So every year, they have this thing called Journée du Patrimoine (Heritage Days) wherein historical spots, museums and the like open their doors to the public for free. Some of the most famous sites visited are the Palais de l’Elysée (Like the Malacanan for the Filipinos or White House for Americans) and the Sénate. Coming from a country where there are almost close to none investments or priority in the arts, I wish we had something like this as well. I still believe that our culture is as rich as the French. It’s just that only a few really bother to preserve it.  That’s another story or probably post. 

For that weekend (September 14-15, 2013), My classmates and I decided to go to the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent.  They opened the office and the studio where Saint Laurent worked. Unaware of what to expect, there was a long line. We waited for an hour and decided to just move on and leave the queue since there were people making us leave anyways.

The Waiting Game.

I was decided that I wanted to go, so I went back the next day to visit. I waited again, not just an hour but 3 hours. Props to my friend for sticking up with the waiting even if he had no direct interest in fashion since he was taking his masters in Public Affairs.

It was so surreal to enter the building, all the waiting made me feel that way, I guess.  Taking photos were not allowed and since I’m not a very descriptive person here’s a photo of the hall where they attended to clients.

http://www.fondation-pb-ysl.net/en/Private-events-615.html

We then headed to the office where my jaw dropped because of the number of Andy Warhol paintings. There was a painting of Marilyn Monroe, but it wasn’t just your usual four-frame-portrait; it was made of like 20 or more. On right side was a handwritten note which says “For Pierre and Yves.” There was more written there but I my memory is failing me. It might have said something like congratulations on your new home or something like that.  There was another Warhol painting hanging inside a hall that seemed like a boardroom. This painting is the larger-than-life portrait of Yves.

Eventually we were brought to the studio where Yves (yehessss first name basis!), worked. There were samples in canvas, samples of dresses he made including the Mondrian and a very elaborate jacket made of intricate beadwork that was shaped into some sort of floral patterns. I can imagine the time, patience and hardwork put to finish that jacket.  It was so eyecatching and elegant. The guide told us that they don’t usually bring the clothes out because they have a special storage in which temperature is maintained to avoid disintegration. There were also compilations of the sketches, all of which are stored in their archives.

I’m also assuming that Andy and Yves were really really really close because even Yves’ dog had a portrait done. If you can see the that yellow with dog portraits in the background, that’s what I’m talking about.

https://i0.wp.com/www.phaidon.com/resource/highres-00007975.jpg
Yves Saint Laurent, with his bulldog Moujik, working in his Paris studio on his final collection, 17 January 2002
Alexandra Bout
http://www.phaidon.com/agenda/photography/picture-galleries/2011/september/13/yves-saint-laurent-the-final-show-archive/

In any case, I thought it was an enriching to visit the office and the studio where most of the creative juices flowed and materialize into an actual clothing. It was like stepping into his own world and even just for a few minutes I was able to experience it. I had to get something that will remind me of this experience. So I got a booklet and this post card with a quote from Yves:

“Nothing is more beautiful than the naked body. The most beautiful clothes that can dress a woman are the arms of the man she loves. But for those of have not yet had the chance to find this happiness, I am here.”

So I would say, that visiting this place is worth it and it reminded me of the value of waiting and accepting what you have right now.

JY

Further Reading and Sources:

1. http://www.paris.fr/english/visit/highlights/journees-du-patrimoine-heritage-days/rub_8208_stand_34125_port_18969

2. http://www.metronews.fr/culture/journees-du-patrimoine-dans-le-studio-d-yves-saint-laurent/mmil!ocjwY58sxZM6/

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